IT Virtualization Serves As Model in Verint-EMC Arena Deal

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Verint Systems Inc. and EMC Corp. are partnering to deliver the video surveillance system at the new KFC Yum! Center (model pictured) in Louisville, Ky., a sports and concert arena scheduled to open Oct. 10.

The system will manage and store video from a network of Verint VGA cameras and Arecont Vision 3-, 5- and 8-megapixel cameras in the arena and its adjacent 975-car parking garage.

Verint and EMC were worked more than a year to win the deal, said John McKenzie, business development manager for EMC Physical Security, and beat out a number of bidders, including one "local" supplier of end-to-end proprietary video systems that McKenzie declined to name, although it is common knowledge that Louisville is home to the Honeywell Security Group.  


The open architecture of the Verint-EMC solution offered the customer, the Louisville Arena Authority, greater return on investment over the long term, McKenzie said. "They can deploy the technology today and be open to the technology available tomorrow," he said.

The flexibility of the all-IP platform also allows for better asset management. Cameras, as well as components, can be added easily. For example, some of the cameras will be fitted with ultra-wide angle lenses from Theia Technologies, McKenzie said. The lenses provide a near 360-degree view without the classic fisheye distortion.

The system's open architecture will also make it easier to add more features and intelligence--such as video analytics--as they become available, McKenzie added.

The pact follows Verint's earlier contract with the arena authority for a surveillance system covering the Louisville Convention Center. Although the two VMS systems are separate, they will be able to offer views into each other's camera networks, said Steve Foley, senior vice president and general manager-Americas for Verint. All four companies involved in the Louisville Arena deal, as well as the integrator, Orion Systems Group, are providing the digital surveillance network to be deployed at Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington for the World Equestrian Games in September.

In addition to the cameras, the arena contract covers Verint's Nextiva VMS software-- configured on Dell servers--and EMC's CLARiiON networked storage system. Specifically, the CLARiiON system will consist of one master server plus two virtual recording servers that will support a 13 terabyte array, said McKenzie.

The architecture marks a major step into virtualization, an IT concept that has become more common in the last few years because it reduces infrastructure and its associated costs. Virtual machines are software that emulates hardware, in this contract's case a DVR. EMC holds a majority stake in VMware, which makes enterprise virtualization software that runs directly on server hardware without requiring an additional underlying operating system.

That video management is incorporating virtualization speaks to the growing influence of IT in surveillance network planning. From McKenzie's perspective, surveillance is just more information for the network to process, and video simply becomes part of the equation for the scalability and flexibility of an organization's information management.

"This was not a video solution or a security solution. It was an information management solution," McKenzie said. "Video security is an IT application. We look at it as managing the information."

Another shift that's accelerating is the deployment of megapixel cameras. "It used to be we sold 5 to 10 percent megapixel cameras and 90 percent others," McKenzie said. "Now it's the other way around."

For the KFC Yum! Center, however, the megapixel-VGA split breaks down to about 50-50, said McKenzie. However, most of the megapixel cameras will be deployed in the arena, where the security task is served by greater image detail. Most of the VGA cameras will be placed in the parking garage. In addition to hosting concerts and sporting events, the KFC Yum! Center will serve as home for the University of Louisville men's and women's basketball teams.

Verint Systems Inc. and EMC Corp. are partnering to deliver the video surveillance system at the new KFC Yum! Center (model pictured) in Louisville, Ky., a sports and concert arena scheduled to open Oct. 10.

The system will manage and store video from a network of Verint VGA cameras and Arecont Vision 3-, 5- and 8-megapixel cameras in the arena and its adjacent 975-car parking garage.

Verint and EMC were worked more than a year to win the deal, said John McKenzie, business development manager for EMC Physical Security, and beat out a number of bidders, including one "local" supplier of end-to-end proprietary video systems that McKenzie declined to name, although it is common knowledge that Louisville is home to the Honeywell Security Group.  


The open architecture of the Verint-EMC solution offered the customer, the Louisville Arena Authority, greater return on investment over the long term, McKenzie said. "They can deploy the technology today and be open to the technology available tomorrow," he said.

The flexibility of the all-IP platform also allows for better asset management. Cameras, as well as components, can be added easily. For example, some of the cameras will be fitted with ultra-wide angle lenses from Theia Technologies, McKenzie said. The lenses provide a near 360-degree view without the classic fisheye distortion.

The system's open architecture will also make it easier to add more features and intelligence--such as video analytics--as they become available, McKenzie added.

The pact follows Verint's earlier contract with the arena authority for a surveillance system covering the Louisville Convention Center. Although the two VMS systems are separate, they will be able to offer views into each other's camera networks, said Steve Foley, senior vice president and general manager-Americas for Verint. All four companies involved in the Louisville Arena deal, as well as the integrator, Orion Systems Group, are providing the digital surveillance network to be deployed at Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington for the World Equestrian Games in September.

In addition to the cameras, the arena contract covers Verint's Nextiva VMS software-- configured on Dell servers--and EMC's CLARiiON networked storage system. Specifically, the CLARiiON system will consist of one master server plus two virtual recording servers that will support a 13 terabyte array, said McKenzie.

The architecture marks a major step into virtualization, an IT concept that has become more common in the last few years because it reduces infrastructure and its associated costs. Virtual machines are software that emulates hardware, in this contract's case a DVR. EMC holds a majority stake in VMware, which makes enterprise virtualization software that runs directly on server hardware without requiring an additional underlying operating system.

That video management is incorporating virtualization speaks to the growing influence of IT in surveillance network planning. From McKenzie's perspective, surveillance is just more information for the network to process, and video simply becomes part of the equation for the scalability and flexibility of an organization's information management.

"This was not a video solution or a security solution. It was an information management solution," McKenzie said. "Video security is an IT application. We look at it as managing the information."

Another shift that's accelerating is the deployment of megapixel cameras. "It used to be we sold 5 to 10 percent megapixel cameras and 90 percent others," McKenzie said. "Now it's the other way around."

For the KFC Yum! Center, however, the megapixel-VGA split breaks down to about 50-50, said McKenzie. However, most of the megapixel cameras will be deployed in the arena, where the security task is served by greater image detail. Most of the VGA cameras will be placed in the parking garage. In addition to hosting concerts and sporting events, the KFC Yum! Center will serve as home for the University of Louisville men's and women's basketball teams.

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2 Comments

IT Virtualization Serves As Model in Verint-EMC Arena Deal - John MacKenzie

Hi Steve,

The point of virtualization is to utilize infrastructure across a broader swath of business and applications. Virtualization provides greater efficiency (and thus better ROI) when there's more than one "tenant" on the system.

This article covers some excellent tier 1 gear (and software). It sounds like a first-class installation. Congratulations to all involved. But it fails to prove its own point that virtualization has somehow delivered value. There's a hint at long-term ROI, but how? It states the case that the system is somehow more open, but if all the gear is dedicated to a single app, there's not much flexibility down the road that benefits from this theoretical openness. I could believe there's some IT automation or management gains, but that value is diluted if all this virtual infrastructure is pinned to a single application. Is it?

I'm a big fan of virtualization, but we cannot make the case that it's delivering value until we're pointing at installs on which the VMS/recording is just another tenant along side other aspects of the business riding the same infrastructure. We can make that case with IP on switches, but its still tricky with recording on storage. I'd be more excited if I could hear how that's the case here.

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