Unified Management For the Low-End

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How low can unified management go? Next Level Security Systems, the latest venture of serial entrepreneur Pete Jankowski, will make its debut this week at the 2010 ISC West. The company is developing an enterprise-class, networked security appliance designed to manage video, access control and voice systems from one interface.

The appliance, dubbed NLSS Gateway, aims to leverage the interoperability specifications under development by the Open Network Video Interface Forum (ONVIF) and the Physical Security Interoperability Alliance (PSIA) to create a management system ideal for installations of 64 cameras or less, said Jankowski, chairman, CEO and founder. Jankowski's last two ventures, Loronix and SyPixx, were acquired by Verint and Cisco Systems, respectively.

"That's our sweet spot, 64 cameras and under, multiple sites, plus access--say a couple of hundred doors." NLSS Gateway will feature an event engine that will bring up video should there be an alarm at a door. It will also handle two-way voice over IP communications between control centers and microphones and speakers at remote cameras, he said. The appliance will use a browser-based interface.

But Jankowski does not consider it a PSIM application, although he does model the system on higher-end management systems. "You've got huge enterprise systems that cost a lot to maintain," he said. "Our thought was to take the same type of of idea but put it in a smaller box."

Although NLSS Gateway may not be on the market until later this year, NLSS's efforts point to the impact standards may have in delivering easier network integration. Incorporating the first release of ONVIF and PSIA specifications, the appliance will be able to provision and self-discover cameras from Axis Communications, Sony, IQinVision, Panasonic, Arecont Vision and Pelco.

NLSS Gateway is the second low-end unified management appliance to be announced in the past two weeks. Both may illustrate the appeal and utility that open systems may ultimately have even for smaller users. Earlier this month, S2 Security unveiled its Pronto box, which is designed for enterprises that have up to 32 access control readers and eight total network nodes. S2 promises the system will be easy to install and configure and, like NLSS Gateway, has a browser-based interface.


How low can unified management go? Next Level Security Systems, the latest venture of serial entrepreneur Pete Jankowski, will make its debut this week at the 2010 ISC West. The company is developing an enterprise-class, networked security appliance designed to manage video, access control and voice systems from one interface.

The appliance, dubbed NLSS Gateway, aims to leverage the interoperability specifications under development by the Open Network Video Interface Forum (ONVIF) and the Physical Security Interoperability Alliance (PSIA) to create a management system ideal for installations of 64 cameras or less, said Jankowski, chairman, CEO and founder. Jankowski's last two ventures, Loronix and SyPixx, were acquired by Verint and Cisco Systems, respectively.

"That's our sweet spot, 64 cameras and under, multiple sites, plus access--say a couple of hundred doors." NLSS Gateway will feature an event engine that will bring up video should there be an alarm at a door. It will also handle two-way voice over IP communications between control centers and microphones and speakers at remote cameras, he said. The appliance will use a browser-based interface.

But Jankowski does not consider it a PSIM application, although he does model the system on higher-end management systems. "You've got huge enterprise systems that cost a lot to maintain," he said. "Our thought was to take the same type of of idea but put it in a smaller box."

Although NLSS Gateway may not be on the market until later this year, NLSS's efforts point to the impact standards may have in delivering easier network integration. Incorporating the first release of ONVIF and PSIA specifications, the appliance will be able to provision and self-discover cameras from Axis Communications, Sony, IQinVision, Panasonic, Arecont Vision and Pelco.

NLSS Gateway is the second low-end unified management appliance to be announced in the past two weeks. Both may illustrate the appeal and utility that open systems may ultimately have even for smaller users. Earlier this month, S2 Security unveiled its Pronto box, which is designed for enterprises that have up to 32 access control readers and eight total network nodes. S2 promises the system will be easy to install and configure and, like NLSS Gateway, has a browser-based interface.


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