TI Enhances DaVinci Line

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Two new chips integrate functions, reduce power consumption and cost

ISC_West_Logo copy.jpgTexas Instruments will unveil the two latest additions to its DaVinci line of system-on-chips (SoCs) at the 2010 ISC West conference and exhibition next week in Las Vegas.

Overall, the chips are likely to increase the general pricing pressure on IP cameras and DVRs. In particular, the chips stand to make edge storage and basic on-board analytics and less expensive.

The new DM8168 DaVinci SoC consolidates video capture, display and control functions of a high-definition multichannel system at four times the compression performance of the TI's previous DM6467T DaVinci chip. "It's a DVR on a chip," Cyril Clocher, video business manager at TI, told Security Squared in a pre-show briefing last week.

The 8168 supports 16 simultaneous channels of H.264 high-profile D1 encoding with CIF multi-streaming, and eight channels of D1 decoding, plus video compositing and graphics supporting up to three independent displays. In high-definition configurations, the 8168 supports dual 1080p capture at 60 fps. Interfaces include Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI, DVI, SATA2, DDR2, DDR3, USB and MMC/SD.

The new chip condenses up to 10 external components onto a 20 x 15 cm board, Clocher said. These include the host processor, application specific integrated circuits used for capture and display, memory and analytics cards, and a PCI bridge. Compared to previous DaVinci chips, power dissipation with the 8168 drops by two-thirds to 8 watts. System cost, in terms of electronic bill of materials, drops to less than $70 from $140.

Hikvision is among the first TI OEM customers to employ the chip, Clocher said. Outside the surveillance space, Polycom and Radvision are using the chip in videoconferencing equipment, he added. Shipments to early adopters are expected to begin in the second quarter. TI will provide customers with video security evaluation modules, which will feature a reference hardware board, software, tools and demonstration applications that will let manufacturers evaluate video processing capabilities and performance as well as begin applications development.

DM8168 DVR rd GUIsm.jpgIn end-user applications, among the innovations the 8168 supports is a graphical interface that can display video windows in conventional format or allow viewer to "flip through" views akin to current Windows-like set-ups (pictured). Camera groups can be easily configured using point-and-click or touch-screen commands, Clocher said.

TI's second introduction, an SoC for IP cameras, integrates basic analytics processing. HikVision also is among the first customers.

The DMVA1 chip packages "entry-level" analytics--people counting, trip zone, camera tamper, intelligent motion detection and streaming metadata--in an on-board co-processor, said Danny Petkevich, TI's video and vision business unit director.

The chip supports high, main or base profile H.264 in D1 at 30 fps, or 720p at lower frame rates, plus a secondary CIF stream. The reference design is priced at $795. Shipments will begin in the second quarter. The chip is pin-to-pin compatible with TI's DM36x DaVinci line, allowing for change-out in existing DaVinci-based cameras.

Two new chips integrate functions, reduce power consumption and cost

ISC_West_Logo copy.jpgTexas Instruments will unveil the two latest additions to its DaVinci line of system-on-chips (SoCs) at the 2010 ISC West conference and exhibition next week in Las Vegas.

Overall, the chips are likely to increase the general pricing pressure on IP cameras and DVRs. In particular, the chips stand to make edge storage and basic on-board analytics and less expensive.

The new DM8168 DaVinci SoC consolidates video capture, display and control functions of a high-definition multichannel system at four times the compression performance of the TI's previous DM6467T DaVinci chip. "It's a DVR on a chip," Cyril Clocher, video business manager at TI, told Security Squared in a pre-show briefing last week.

The 8168 supports 16 simultaneous channels of H.264 high-profile D1 encoding with CIF multi-streaming, and eight channels of D1 decoding, plus video compositing and graphics supporting up to three independent displays. In high-definition configurations, the 8168 supports dual 1080p capture at 60 fps. Interfaces include Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI, DVI, SATA2, DDR2, DDR3, USB and MMC/SD.

The new chip condenses up to 10 external components onto a 20 x 15 cm board, Clocher said. These include the host processor, application specific integrated circuits used for capture and display, memory and analytics cards, and a PCI bridge. Compared to previous DaVinci chips, power dissipation with the 8168 drops by two-thirds to 8 watts. System cost, in terms of electronic bill of materials, drops to less than $70 from $140.

Hikvision is among the first TI OEM customers to employ the chip, Clocher said. Outside the surveillance space, Polycom and Radvision are using the chip in videoconferencing equipment, he added. Shipments to early adopters are expected to begin in the second quarter. TI will provide customers with video security evaluation modules, which will feature a reference hardware board, software, tools and demonstration applications that will let manufacturers evaluate video processing capabilities and performance as well as begin applications development.

DM8168 DVR rd GUIsm.jpgIn end-user applications, among the innovations the 8168 supports is a graphical interface that can display video windows in conventional format or allow viewer to "flip through" views akin to current Windows-like set-ups (pictured). Camera groups can be easily configured using point-and-click or touch-screen commands, Clocher said.

TI's second introduction, an SoC for IP cameras, integrates basic analytics processing. HikVision also is among the first customers.

The DMVA1 chip packages "entry-level" analytics--people counting, trip zone, camera tamper, intelligent motion detection and streaming metadata--in an on-board co-processor, said Danny Petkevich, TI's video and vision business unit director.

The chip supports high, main or base profile H.264 in D1 at 30 fps, or 720p at lower frame rates, plus a secondary CIF stream. The reference design is priced at $795. Shipments will begin in the second quarter. The chip is pin-to-pin compatible with TI's DM36x DaVinci line, allowing for change-out in existing DaVinci-based cameras.

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