New VideoIQ Dome Cameras Build In 500 GB Storage

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VideoIQ has added a line of dome cameras, including a megapixel model, to its IP-based iCVR series, equipped with onboard recording, storage and analytics. The company also introduced a line of streaming cameras and encoders for use in environments with centralized storage and third-party video management systems.

The new models will make their debut at the 2010 ISC West Conference and Exposition next week in Las Vegas.

The megapixel dome camera--designated iCVR-MP--is among the first to incorporate Sony's new 3-megapixel, 1080p sensor, which enhances camera performance in low-light conditions, said Scott Schnell, president and CEO of VideoIQ.

VIQdome.jpgBoth the standard (pictured) and megapixel versions can handle up to 500 gigabytes of memory using solid state cards which, when full, write to an on-board disk drive, eliminating the need for backhaul to and storage on a centralized NVR. VideoIQ refers to the feature as zero bandwidth recording. Storage at the edge also reduces power and bandwidth consumption as well as the risk of a large loss of video files from a disk failure on a stand-alone NVR.

"A system that must transmit data 24 hours a day seven days a week to a central device without fail is a system that will fail," Schnell said. At 5 frames-per-second, each megapixel camera will store up to one month of continuous recording at 1080p with 250 GB, he added, and up to two months with 500 GB. At D1 rates, storage capacity extends to several months. After that, video that users wish to save can be archived in standard IT-based storage set-ups. Rarely do high-resolution images have to be transmitted over the network in real-time. "You never backhaul unless you need to," said Schnell.

For these reasons, distributed storage architectures have been gaining traction in security networks. The central dilemma is that while users desire to have surveillance cameras recording all the time, only a small fraction of what's recorded is relevant. To reconcile demand for a surfeit of recordings with a scarcity of bandwidth, camera manufacturers are increasingly packaging memory at the edge.

"It's a better way to build a surveillance infrastructure," Schnell said. "And for some customers, it's the only way to build a surveillance infrastructure."

In addition to VideoIQ's new cameras, a number of ISC West announcements could spotlight this trend. March Networks' video management software already incorporates a feature that can directly access and manage on-board camera storage devices. Milestone Systems reportedly will announce a similar feature next week. Meanwhile, decentralized storage itself could spark even more interest in wireless mesh and WiFi networks because of the bandwidth reduction it facilitates.

All cameras in the iCVR dome line feature on-board analytics. The megapixel version features the company's so-called "IQTrack viewing." As a person or vehicle crosses the camera's 16 x 9 field, IQTrack will digitally zoom in on the target and follow it. Meanwhile, the entire field is still being recorded. The camera also permits two streams to be viewed simultaneously. One user can follow the portion of the image isolated by IQTrack, while another can view the entire image, Schnell said. Overall, the company says the iCVR megapixel analytics deliver two times the range of D1 analytics.

The D1 iCVR dome cameras are available now, Schnell said. The megapixel models will begin shipping in late summer, he added.

Meanwhile, VideoIQ's new iCST line of streaming cameras are designed for use with NVRs and central storage. The cameras are available in resolutions up to 1080p and feature VideoIQ's on-board analytics. The cameras are IP66 rated for indoor and outdoor use and integrate with a number of IP-based video management platforms including Milestone, OnSSI and Genetec. Standard definition models are available now. The HD megapixel version will start shipping in late summer.

VideoIQ has added a line of dome cameras, including a megapixel model, to its IP-based iCVR series, equipped with onboard recording, storage and analytics. The company also introduced a line of streaming cameras and encoders for use in environments with centralized storage and third-party video management systems.

The new models will make their debut at the 2010 ISC West Conference and Exposition next week in Las Vegas.

The megapixel dome camera--designated iCVR-MP--is among the first to incorporate Sony's new 3-megapixel, 1080p sensor, which enhances camera performance in low-light conditions, said Scott Schnell, president and CEO of VideoIQ.

VIQdome.jpgBoth the standard (pictured) and megapixel versions can handle up to 500 gigabytes of memory using solid state cards which, when full, write to an on-board disk drive, eliminating the need for backhaul to and storage on a centralized NVR. VideoIQ refers to the feature as zero bandwidth recording. Storage at the edge also reduces power and bandwidth consumption as well as the risk of a large loss of video files from a disk failure on a stand-alone NVR.

"A system that must transmit data 24 hours a day seven days a week to a central device without fail is a system that will fail," Schnell said. At 5 frames-per-second, each megapixel camera will store up to one month of continuous recording at 1080p with 250 GB, he added, and up to two months with 500 GB. At D1 rates, storage capacity extends to several months. After that, video that users wish to save can be archived in standard IT-based storage set-ups. Rarely do high-resolution images have to be transmitted over the network in real-time. "You never backhaul unless you need to," said Schnell.

For these reasons, distributed storage architectures have been gaining traction in security networks. The central dilemma is that while users desire to have surveillance cameras recording all the time, only a small fraction of what's recorded is relevant. To reconcile demand for a surfeit of recordings with a scarcity of bandwidth, camera manufacturers are increasingly packaging memory at the edge.

"It's a better way to build a surveillance infrastructure," Schnell said. "And for some customers, it's the only way to build a surveillance infrastructure."

In addition to VideoIQ's new cameras, a number of ISC West announcements could spotlight this trend. March Networks' video management software already incorporates a feature that can directly access and manage on-board camera storage devices. Milestone Systems reportedly will announce a similar feature next week. Meanwhile, decentralized storage itself could spark even more interest in wireless mesh and WiFi networks because of the bandwidth reduction it facilitates.

All cameras in the iCVR dome line feature on-board analytics. The megapixel version features the company's so-called "IQTrack viewing." As a person or vehicle crosses the camera's 16 x 9 field, IQTrack will digitally zoom in on the target and follow it. Meanwhile, the entire field is still being recorded. The camera also permits two streams to be viewed simultaneously. One user can follow the portion of the image isolated by IQTrack, while another can view the entire image, Schnell said. Overall, the company says the iCVR megapixel analytics deliver two times the range of D1 analytics.

The D1 iCVR dome cameras are available now, Schnell said. The megapixel models will begin shipping in late summer, he added.

Meanwhile, VideoIQ's new iCST line of streaming cameras are designed for use with NVRs and central storage. The cameras are available in resolutions up to 1080p and feature VideoIQ's on-board analytics. The cameras are IP66 rated for indoor and outdoor use and integrate with a number of IP-based video management platforms including Milestone, OnSSI and Genetec. Standard definition models are available now. The HD megapixel version will start shipping in late summer.

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