Updated--Megapixel Market Drives IP Surveillance

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The megapixel camera market continues to heat up heading into 2010 as smaller manufacturers begin to test the waters of what is considered the most promising segment of the IP camera market.

V1770 Series HD PTZ DomeHI.jpgInfinova this week introduced a new line of megapixel cameras it is positioning as a way users can begin an economical analog-to-digital transition. The company joins some 20 other major players with megapixel cameras on the market of in the pipeline. Infinova's 1.3-megapixel model (domed PTZ version pictured) is available now will be available following the ISC West conference in late March, said Mark Wilson, vice president of marketing for Infinova. The remainder of the line, which will scale to 3 megapixels, will roll out over the next 12 months the course of 2010, he said.

Infinova's rollout reflects the bifurcated nature of the current market for video surveillance cameras. Although the recession has tamped down overall global growth, the IP and megapixel segment has remained a bright spot. In a report released November 30, IMS Research said the global video surveillance market grew just 3 percent in 2009. The growth rate for global IP video surveillance equipment, however, is likely to exceed 15 percent, the report said.


In-Stat predicts IP surveillance will drive much of the near-term growth of the U.S. market. The market research firm forecasts 27 percent compound annual growth between 2009 and 2012. It sets the current U.S. IP surveillance market at $13 billion.

Up-to-date megapixel forecasts have been difficult to tease out. In February 2008, IMS Research predicted that more than 500,000 megapixel units would be shipped in 2009. The firm declined to say if actual 2009 numbers bore this prediction out.

Industry analyst and consultant John Honovich, combining his own research with data compiled from a number of reports, predicts 200 percent growth for IP surveillance equipment between 2010 and 2012. Among the major drivers, he reports, will be low-end 1.3-megapixel cameras, which he sees cutting into the cost advantage of analog cameras.

Anecdotal reports also are optimistic. "All verticals are seeing a lot of growth. Casinos have been stronger than expected," said Paul Bodell, vice president of marketing and sales for IQinVision, a megapixel camera vendor.

Another factor that most observers agree is influencing megapixel camera growth is the amount of additional image data they generate. This data can be used in applications beyond security and surveillance, such as to determine whether casino players need drinks, analyze traffic in retail stores and, in general, add to the level of strategic intelligence available to the business. As users shift not just toward IP, but toward integrated, network-oriented security platforms, the attractiveness and value of megapixel cameras increases commensurately. 

The "workhorse" model

As 1.3-megapixel cameras offer the rough equivalent of 780p high-definition video, Honovich sees these becoming the "more widely adopted," he told Security Squared. Honovich also said there were enough differentiators, such as in bandwidth consumption, performance in low light and enclosures and packaging, all of which will affect price, that the sector will attract new entrants, leading to robust competition for the next few years. By 2012, however, commoditization could become an issue, just as it has for standard IP cameras today.

Infinova is launching its V1770 camera line includes a high-definition 360-degree continuous rotation IP PTZ dome camera with 1.3-megapixel resolution using a Sony progressive scan CCD, delivering 30 fps with an 18x optical zoom and a 12x digital zoom. The model, available as of mid-December, provides low-light performance at 0.02 lux and offers both MPEG-4 and MJPEG compression.

Infinova will follow with 2- and 3-megapixel versions in March and December 2010, respectively, Wilson said. These two versions will be H.264-compliant, although Wilson did not disclose the specific profile. By next year, all three models in the line will be compliant with the Open Network Video Interface Forum (ONVIF) specification for camera to video management software (VMS) interoperability, Infinova also is a member of the Open Network Video Interface Forum (ONVIF), Wilson added.

Wilson also emphasized the simplicity of the cameras, which will incorporate Texas Instruments' DM355 Da Vinci processors. The chip hardware, plus a single software developers' kit (SDK) promise easier integration with VMS systems. Wilson said. The cameras have been successfully tested with 11 VMS vendors, including Exacq Technologies, Genetec, Milestone Systems, NICE Systems and OnSSI. "We will work to bring as many products into this circle as we can," he said.

Wilson sees 1.3-megapixel as a "workhorse" model, ideal for users making an initial transition from analog to digital. "As a user, you need a bridge to IP," he said. "But you have to be able to cross at your own pace in a cost-managed way and extend the life of existing equipment."

Typically one 1.3-megapixel camera can cover twice the field as a standard analog camera and, as a rule of thumb, can replace two conventional cameras. This ratio shrinks as megapixel increase. For example, one 2-megapixel model can be counted on to replace three standard cameras. 

Raul Calderon, vice president of marketing at Arecont Vision, which supplies camera models ranging from 1.3 to 8 megapixels, agreed with Wilson on the ease with which 1.3-megapixel cameras can fit into a legacy system, but believes the trend toward slow transition is fading. "We're seeing wider deployment of 300 to 500 cameras in campuses, data centers and casinos. They are not all megapixel, but they are all IP. This was not the case three years ago."

New entrants will put pressure on per-unit cost, but low price will continue to be weighed against other features, such as low light performance, panoramic views, and standardization, Calderon said. Most camera vendors will offer 1.3 megapixel models, because it is a basic entry level product. "It is as easy to do as VGA IP," he said. "Leaders will have a full suite."
 
 

The megapixel camera market continues to heat up heading into 2010 as smaller manufacturers begin to test the waters of what is considered the most promising segment of the IP camera market.

V1770 Series HD PTZ DomeHI.jpgInfinova this week introduced a new line of megapixel cameras it is positioning as a way users can begin an economical analog-to-digital transition. The company joins some 20 other major players with megapixel cameras on the market of in the pipeline. Infinova's 1.3-megapixel model (domed PTZ version pictured) is available now will be available following the ISC West conference in late March, said Mark Wilson, vice president of marketing for Infinova. The remainder of the line, which will scale to 3 megapixels, will roll out over the next 12 months the course of 2010, he said.

Infinova's rollout reflects the bifurcated nature of the current market for video surveillance cameras. Although the recession has tamped down overall global growth, the IP and megapixel segment has remained a bright spot. In a report released November 30, IMS Research said the global video surveillance market grew just 3 percent in 2009. The growth rate for global IP video surveillance equipment, however, is likely to exceed 15 percent, the report said.


In-Stat predicts IP surveillance will drive much of the near-term growth of the U.S. market. The market research firm forecasts 27 percent compound annual growth between 2009 and 2012. It sets the current U.S. IP surveillance market at $13 billion.

Up-to-date megapixel forecasts have been difficult to tease out. In February 2008, IMS Research predicted that more than 500,000 megapixel units would be shipped in 2009. The firm declined to say if actual 2009 numbers bore this prediction out.

Industry analyst and consultant John Honovich, combining his own research with data compiled from a number of reports, predicts 200 percent growth for IP surveillance equipment between 2010 and 2012. Among the major drivers, he reports, will be low-end 1.3-megapixel cameras, which he sees cutting into the cost advantage of analog cameras.

Anecdotal reports also are optimistic. "All verticals are seeing a lot of growth. Casinos have been stronger than expected," said Paul Bodell, vice president of marketing and sales for IQinVision, a megapixel camera vendor.

Another factor that most observers agree is influencing megapixel camera growth is the amount of additional image data they generate. This data can be used in applications beyond security and surveillance, such as to determine whether casino players need drinks, analyze traffic in retail stores and, in general, add to the level of strategic intelligence available to the business. As users shift not just toward IP, but toward integrated, network-oriented security platforms, the attractiveness and value of megapixel cameras increases commensurately. 

The "workhorse" model

As 1.3-megapixel cameras offer the rough equivalent of 780p high-definition video, Honovich sees these becoming the "more widely adopted," he told Security Squared. Honovich also said there were enough differentiators, such as in bandwidth consumption, performance in low light and enclosures and packaging, all of which will affect price, that the sector will attract new entrants, leading to robust competition for the next few years. By 2012, however, commoditization could become an issue, just as it has for standard IP cameras today.

Infinova is launching its V1770 camera line includes a high-definition 360-degree continuous rotation IP PTZ dome camera with 1.3-megapixel resolution using a Sony progressive scan CCD, delivering 30 fps with an 18x optical zoom and a 12x digital zoom. The model, available as of mid-December, provides low-light performance at 0.02 lux and offers both MPEG-4 and MJPEG compression.

Infinova will follow with 2- and 3-megapixel versions in March and December 2010, respectively, Wilson said. These two versions will be H.264-compliant, although Wilson did not disclose the specific profile. By next year, all three models in the line will be compliant with the Open Network Video Interface Forum (ONVIF) specification for camera to video management software (VMS) interoperability, Infinova also is a member of the Open Network Video Interface Forum (ONVIF), Wilson added.

Wilson also emphasized the simplicity of the cameras, which will incorporate Texas Instruments' DM355 Da Vinci processors. The chip hardware, plus a single software developers' kit (SDK) promise easier integration with VMS systems. Wilson said. The cameras have been successfully tested with 11 VMS vendors, including Exacq Technologies, Genetec, Milestone Systems, NICE Systems and OnSSI. "We will work to bring as many products into this circle as we can," he said.

Wilson sees 1.3-megapixel as a "workhorse" model, ideal for users making an initial transition from analog to digital. "As a user, you need a bridge to IP," he said. "But you have to be able to cross at your own pace in a cost-managed way and extend the life of existing equipment."

Typically one 1.3-megapixel camera can cover twice the field as a standard analog camera and, as a rule of thumb, can replace two conventional cameras. This ratio shrinks as megapixel increase. For example, one 2-megapixel model can be counted on to replace three standard cameras. 

Raul Calderon, vice president of marketing at Arecont Vision, which supplies camera models ranging from 1.3 to 8 megapixels, agreed with Wilson on the ease with which 1.3-megapixel cameras can fit into a legacy system, but believes the trend toward slow transition is fading. "We're seeing wider deployment of 300 to 500 cameras in campuses, data centers and casinos. They are not all megapixel, but they are all IP. This was not the case three years ago."

New entrants will put pressure on per-unit cost, but low price will continue to be weighed against other features, such as low light performance, panoramic views, and standardization, Calderon said. Most camera vendors will offer 1.3 megapixel models, because it is a basic entry level product. "It is as easy to do as VGA IP," he said. "Leaders will have a full suite."
 
 

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