Rasilient Debuts Video Storage Appliance

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Rasilient Systems, a Sunnyvale, Calif.-based start-up, has unveiled a platform designed to optimize large amounts of surveillance video streams for storage.

The storage issue that surveillance video creates has begun to attract greater attention from the IT side of the enterprise, which is pressing security departments to consolidate surveillance storage with the platforms that serve the larger organization, While security departments tend to resist, IT departments are gaining more influence on overall storage architecture, said Cesar Vasquez, vice president of corporate development at Ralsilient. .

Still, capacity requirements, the lengthening periods video files must be preserved, plus the huge imbalance between data writes and reads (some say 98/2), require special optimization if video storage is going to mix well with other IT applications. This is where the PixelStor line comes into play, said Peter Parlmer, product line manager for the company.

Showcased this week at the 2009 International Seminar and Exhibits, Rasilient's PixelStor 3000 IP-SAN takes large amounts if non-sequential data that can generated by hundreds of cameras and parses and realigns it sequentially when writing it to a disk. The technology applies available storage space much more efficiently results in far less disk fragmentation, Parlmer said.

At the same time, Rasilient's patented caching mechanism, dubbed FlowThrough, prevents frames from being lost during times when there is a significant amount of data access and retrieval occurring, he added.

The 2-rack unit, 12-bay appliance, along with an enhancement unit and management tool will begin shipping to systems integrators in December. The technology is also being sold on an OEM basis to ZTE and Unified Information Technology (UIT), two major Chinese IT manufacturers, said Vasquez.

Rasilient's solution is built around an Intel modular server, which includes an integrated storage area network (SAN) consisting of 14 hot-swappable 2.5-inch drives, and a 22-port Gigabit Ethernet switch. The equipment replaces conventional NVRs, which top out at about 4 terabytes (TB), with a storage platform that integrates video management software.  At, its demonstration was running Milestone Systems software. PixelStor starts at 9TB and scales to 168TB, Parlmer said.


Rasilient Systems, a Sunnyvale, Calif.-based start-up, has unveiled a platform designed to optimize large amounts of surveillance video streams for storage.

The storage issue that surveillance video creates has begun to attract greater attention from the IT side of the enterprise, which is pressing security departments to consolidate surveillance storage with the platforms that serve the larger organization, While security departments tend to resist, IT departments are gaining more influence on overall storage architecture, said Cesar Vasquez, vice president of corporate development at Ralsilient. .

Still, capacity requirements, the lengthening periods video files must be preserved, plus the huge imbalance between data writes and reads (some say 98/2), require special optimization if video storage is going to mix well with other IT applications. This is where the PixelStor line comes into play, said Peter Parlmer, product line manager for the company.

Showcased this week at the 2009 International Seminar and Exhibits, Rasilient's PixelStor 3000 IP-SAN takes large amounts if non-sequential data that can generated by hundreds of cameras and parses and realigns it sequentially when writing it to a disk. The technology applies available storage space much more efficiently results in far less disk fragmentation, Parlmer said.

At the same time, Rasilient's patented caching mechanism, dubbed FlowThrough, prevents frames from being lost during times when there is a significant amount of data access and retrieval occurring, he added.

The 2-rack unit, 12-bay appliance, along with an enhancement unit and management tool will begin shipping to systems integrators in December. The technology is also being sold on an OEM basis to ZTE and Unified Information Technology (UIT), two major Chinese IT manufacturers, said Vasquez.

Rasilient's solution is built around an Intel modular server, which includes an integrated storage area network (SAN) consisting of 14 hot-swappable 2.5-inch drives, and a 22-port Gigabit Ethernet switch. The equipment replaces conventional NVRs, which top out at about 4 terabytes (TB), with a storage platform that integrates video management software.  At, its demonstration was running Milestone Systems software. PixelStor starts at 9TB and scales to 168TB, Parlmer said.


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