TimeSight Systems and the Storage Conundrum

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The sheer reality of increasing numbers of cameras, higher resolution and lengthening archiving requirements are putting pressure on storage architectures, according to Charles Foley, CEO of TimeSight Systems. "Storage is the dominant cost factor of any [surveillance] installation," Foley told attendees at the IP User Group's IP-in-Action conference in Dallas Tuesday.

TimeSight manufactures NVRs that reduce the size of video files over time, taking them from highest information in the first few days of recording--the high-risk period when surveillance video is likely to be most needed--and gradually reducing the file size over time and as the risk period declines. Timesight claims to be unique in applying a two-fold process to video lifecycle management (VLM)-dynamic H.264 compression-over-time and motion optimized recording, where, as the name suggests, more storage capacity is reserved for images containing object in motion.

In the video, Foley talks about the difficult choice users face in handling their increasing requirement for higher resolution video, and the cost of retaining that video over time, and how dynamic compression can help.

The company, founded in 2004, is positioning itself as the storage solution for a megapixel world. As Foley explains in the video, megapixel images compress very well. Since images start with more information, a compressed 70 kb megapixel image will contain more detail than a 70kb compressed VGA or MPEG4 file.



The sheer reality of increasing numbers of cameras, higher resolution and lengthening archiving requirements are putting pressure on storage architectures, according to Charles Foley, CEO of TimeSight Systems. "Storage is the dominant cost factor of any [surveillance] installation," Foley told attendees at the IP User Group's IP-in-Action conference in Dallas Tuesday.

TimeSight manufactures NVRs that reduce the size of video files over time, taking them from highest information in the first few days of recording--the high-risk period when surveillance video is likely to be most needed--and gradually reducing the file size over time and as the risk period declines. Timesight claims to be unique in applying a two-fold process to video lifecycle management (VLM)-dynamic H.264 compression-over-time and motion optimized recording, where, as the name suggests, more storage capacity is reserved for images containing object in motion.

In the video, Foley talks about the difficult choice users face in handling their increasing requirement for higher resolution video, and the cost of retaining that video over time, and how dynamic compression can help.

The company, founded in 2004, is positioning itself as the storage solution for a megapixel world. As Foley explains in the video, megapixel images compress very well. Since images start with more information, a compressed 70 kb megapixel image will contain more detail than a 70kb compressed VGA or MPEG4 file.



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