Lighting Tips for Wireless Cameras

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Michael I. Harper, an installer out of the U.K., offers some tips on inexpensive ways to keep indoor areas under surveillance lit well enough for cameras to be effective. While his post pertains to smaller installations, his notes hold true for any organization looking to avoid the expense of infrared cameras.

Significantly, Harper is high on the use of remote control via IP and the Internet, to set up the cameras and the lights to work in tandem. An excerpt follows. The full article can be found at ezinearticles.com.

As already mentioned, infra-red lighting produces black and white images, so if you want crisp, full colour images after dark the best way to achieve this is to add some conventional lighting to the scene. A cheap and effective solution is to have a table lamp or two dotted around the room. These can be fitted with timers so that they come on only during the night, and using low-energy bulbs makes them very inexpensive to leave on. You will have full colour images all night and even if you need to buy several lights it will likely be far less expensive than a camera with infra-red capability. The only thing to watch out for is where to place the lights. They should enhance the scene without dazzling the camera, so if at all possible the lights should be out of shot. If this is not possible, lampshades will help to diffuse the light. A certain amount of experimentation may be required to get the best results.

One of the real benefits of wireless internet CCTV cameras is their capability to communicate intelligently across the internet. This capability can be put to good use when it comes to lighting. You can obtain a very inexpensive kit from a specialist supplier that will enable the camera, unbelievably, to switch the lights on and off, which avoids them being on all night. You can get this set up so that motion detection can cause the camera to switch the lights on and it will then get a better look at any intruders! Of course, a major drawback of this approach is that the camera may not detect movement in the first place if the scene is too dark. Instead of controlling the light switching by motion detection, you can choose to switch the lights on and off manually. You can simply click a button on your camera's web page or, amazingly, even send an SMS text message from your mobile phone to switch the lights on and off in your home, even from the other side of the world! These possibilities have only become a reality thanks to the communication skills of internet CCTV cameras, a far cry from the old analogue CCTV systems.

Michael I. Harper, an installer out of the U.K., offers some tips on inexpensive ways to keep indoor areas under surveillance lit well enough for cameras to be effective. While his post pertains to smaller installations, his notes hold true for any organization looking to avoid the expense of infrared cameras.

Significantly, Harper is high on the use of remote control via IP and the Internet, to set up the cameras and the lights to work in tandem. An excerpt follows. The full article can be found at ezinearticles.com.

As already mentioned, infra-red lighting produces black and white images, so if you want crisp, full colour images after dark the best way to achieve this is to add some conventional lighting to the scene. A cheap and effective solution is to have a table lamp or two dotted around the room. These can be fitted with timers so that they come on only during the night, and using low-energy bulbs makes them very inexpensive to leave on. You will have full colour images all night and even if you need to buy several lights it will likely be far less expensive than a camera with infra-red capability. The only thing to watch out for is where to place the lights. They should enhance the scene without dazzling the camera, so if at all possible the lights should be out of shot. If this is not possible, lampshades will help to diffuse the light. A certain amount of experimentation may be required to get the best results.

One of the real benefits of wireless internet CCTV cameras is their capability to communicate intelligently across the internet. This capability can be put to good use when it comes to lighting. You can obtain a very inexpensive kit from a specialist supplier that will enable the camera, unbelievably, to switch the lights on and off, which avoids them being on all night. You can get this set up so that motion detection can cause the camera to switch the lights on and it will then get a better look at any intruders! Of course, a major drawback of this approach is that the camera may not detect movement in the first place if the scene is too dark. Instead of controlling the light switching by motion detection, you can choose to switch the lights on and off manually. You can simply click a button on your camera's web page or, amazingly, even send an SMS text message from your mobile phone to switch the lights on and off in your home, even from the other side of the world! These possibilities have only become a reality thanks to the communication skills of internet CCTV cameras, a far cry from the old analogue CCTV systems.

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