State-of-the-Art Video Integration at Macau's City of Dreams

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surveillance_interfaces.jpgSecurity professionals following the casino sector know that Macau is setting the pace on integrating video surveillance systems into larger resort information systems. Now comes Willy Allison's informative interview with Leroy Daniel, director of surveillance at Melco Crown Entertainment's City of Dreams hotel and casino, which opened June 1.

Daniel, the subject of this month's "Catwalk" feature at Allison's World Game Protection site, discusses implementing a network of Dallmeier IP cameras to cover 5,800 square feet, including a gaming floor offering 1,500 slot machines and 550 table games.

As Daniel's tells Allison:

The surveillance system for City of Dreams is an IP-based system with distributed architecture comprising of servers, switches, workstations, network storage unit (NSU), and cameras. The IP cameras encode the images at 25 fps at D1 (720 x 576 pixels) resolution and the signal is then transmitted to the NSU via the surveillance network for recording. The cameras support multicasting to enable the live video stream to be broadcast to multiple workstations/monitors while the recorded camera images are streaming from the NSU. All camera switching is done through a virtual matrix that has allowed us to utilize more effectively the large amount of space that would traditionally be taken up by an analog matrix.

We have one of the world's first and largest 100% end-to-end IP casino surveillance systems. This means image encoding takes place directly within the IP Camera unit prior to being run through the surveillance network after which decoding takes place just before play back on LCD monitors.

Further down, Daniel talks about network-centric video surveillance.

In this age of digital recording, IP network systems, advanced software applications, high and low level interfaces, we try to leverage off current and advancing technologies to develop a "state-of- the-art" asset protection system.

With that in mind, we are integrating and interfacing into our entire core revenue, gaming and security systems. This not only means "real time" automated alerts, efficient resource allocation and proactive monitoring but also allows us to capture and utilize "business intelligence" so that resources can be allocated according to the business demands and needs at the time. Let's face it; resources are always stretched thin in surveillance.

I fully believe that with CCTV systems and camera input numbers up in the thousands, the days of punching up cameras hoping to "catch" something are gone. Large-scale surveillance operations can no longer be "stand-alone" systems but must be an integrated part of the business. There are definite efficiencies to be gained in doing this because if you have relevant information and events coming directly into the room and being delivered straight to your operators you don't need as many of them continually looking for it. This is bottom-line dollars both saved and protected!

In his comments, Daniel only hints at the scope of the surveillance integration into other business systems. But some tantalizing details are revealed in an accompanying illustration (click on thumbnail above)  that shows how the surveillance interfaces with access control, RFID-embedded casino chips, retail POS, the hotel guest management system, business intelligence and data mining, and a surveillance database. Dig the electronic flyer on Mads Mikkelsen as James Bond villain Le Chiffre.

surveillance_interfaces.jpgSecurity professionals following the casino sector know that Macau is setting the pace on integrating video surveillance systems into larger resort information systems. Now comes Willy Allison's informative interview with Leroy Daniel, director of surveillance at Melco Crown Entertainment's City of Dreams hotel and casino, which opened June 1.

Daniel, the subject of this month's "Catwalk" feature at Allison's World Game Protection site, discusses implementing a network of Dallmeier IP cameras to cover 5,800 square feet, including a gaming floor offering 1,500 slot machines and 550 table games.

As Daniel's tells Allison:

The surveillance system for City of Dreams is an IP-based system with distributed architecture comprising of servers, switches, workstations, network storage unit (NSU), and cameras. The IP cameras encode the images at 25 fps at D1 (720 x 576 pixels) resolution and the signal is then transmitted to the NSU via the surveillance network for recording. The cameras support multicasting to enable the live video stream to be broadcast to multiple workstations/monitors while the recorded camera images are streaming from the NSU. All camera switching is done through a virtual matrix that has allowed us to utilize more effectively the large amount of space that would traditionally be taken up by an analog matrix.

We have one of the world's first and largest 100% end-to-end IP casino surveillance systems. This means image encoding takes place directly within the IP Camera unit prior to being run through the surveillance network after which decoding takes place just before play back on LCD monitors.

Further down, Daniel talks about network-centric video surveillance.

In this age of digital recording, IP network systems, advanced software applications, high and low level interfaces, we try to leverage off current and advancing technologies to develop a "state-of- the-art" asset protection system.

With that in mind, we are integrating and interfacing into our entire core revenue, gaming and security systems. This not only means "real time" automated alerts, efficient resource allocation and proactive monitoring but also allows us to capture and utilize "business intelligence" so that resources can be allocated according to the business demands and needs at the time. Let's face it; resources are always stretched thin in surveillance.

I fully believe that with CCTV systems and camera input numbers up in the thousands, the days of punching up cameras hoping to "catch" something are gone. Large-scale surveillance operations can no longer be "stand-alone" systems but must be an integrated part of the business. There are definite efficiencies to be gained in doing this because if you have relevant information and events coming directly into the room and being delivered straight to your operators you don't need as many of them continually looking for it. This is bottom-line dollars both saved and protected!

In his comments, Daniel only hints at the scope of the surveillance integration into other business systems. But some tantalizing details are revealed in an accompanying illustration (click on thumbnail above)  that shows how the surveillance interfaces with access control, RFID-embedded casino chips, retail POS, the hotel guest management system, business intelligence and data mining, and a surveillance database. Dig the electronic flyer on Mads Mikkelsen as James Bond villain Le Chiffre.

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